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Archive for January, 2012

Georgia Society of Anesthesiologists Winter Forum

Saturday, January 21st, 2012

January 21, 2012, Westin Atlanta Perimeter North, Atlanta. For more information, visit Georgia Society of Anesthesiologists.

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Georgia Society of Anesthesiologists Winter Forum

Saturday, January 21st, 2012

January 21, 2012

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Atlanta Dermatological Assoc. Tri-Annual Meeting

Saturday, January 21st, 2012

January 21, 2012 at Piedmont Hospital.  For more information, visit Atlanta Dermatological Association.

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Atlanta Dermatological Assoc. Tri-Annual Meeting

Saturday, January 21st, 2012

January 21, 2012

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Jagdeep Singh, MD Named VP of Medical Affairs/Chief Medical Officer

Friday, January 20th, 2012

Jagdeep Singh, MD, is the new Vice President for Medical Affairs (VPMA)/Chief Medical Officer for Piedmont Henry Hospital.

Dr. Singh has previous experience as a VPMA in healthcare systems in Minneapolis, Minn. and Buffalo, N.Y.  Prior to becoming a VPMA, Dr. Singh was an emergency physician as well as the EMS Medical Director in Columbus, GA. He holds an MBA in the Physician Executive Program from Auburn University and is a Certified Physician Executive (CPE) and a Fellow in the American College of Healthcare Executives (FACHE).

At Piedmont Henry Hospital, Dr. Singh will have administrative responsibility for the Performance Improvement Department and the Medical Staff Office. He will work closely with Case Management in the area of utilization management and with other departments towards the goal of improving quality of care, cost effectiveness in the delivery of care, and improvement of clinical processes at Piedmont Henry Hospital. Dr. Singh will serve as a liaison between the hospital and medical staff and will work closely with Piedmont Healthcare during the integration process into the Piedmont system.

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North Georgia Medical Managers Association Meeting

Friday, January 20th, 2012

February 9, 2012

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Leading Surgeons to Practice at Strickland Heart Center

Wednesday, January 18th, 2012

Cardiac and thoracic surgeons Alexander G. Justicz, MD, and David A. Langford, MD, have joined Gwinnett Medical Center (GMC) and will serve as the lead surgeons at the new Strickland Heart Center when GMC starts its open heart surgery program this month.

Dr. Langford has been affiliated with the hospital system for nearly two years, serving GMC in an administrative capacity as the medical director for cardiovascular surgery. Langford was directly involved in all aspects of the development of GMC’s open heart surgery program.

Dr. Justicz specializes in all aspects of adult cardiac surgery with particular interest in mitral valve repair, aortic surgery, less invasive techniques and complex reoperative surgery. Dr. Justicz was the chief of cardiac surgery at Piedmont Hospital for six years and was the lead surgeon responsible for the launch of the open heart surgery program at Northeast Georgia Medical Center in Gainesville in 2002. A member of the newly-formed Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgeons – Gwinnett Medical Group, he is board certified in thoracic surgery.

Dr. Langford is board certified in thoracic surgery. His areas of expertise include aortic valve interventions, coronary artery disease, valve disease and heart failure, among others. Dr. Langford, an employee of St. Joseph’s Medical Group, practiced for nearly 20 years at St. Joseph’s Hospital of Atlanta. During much of that time, he also practiced at Piedmont Hospital of Atlanta and Northeast Georgia Medical Center in Gainesville.

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WellStar Appoints Vice President and Chief of Hospitalist Services

Wednesday, January 18th, 2012

Val Akopov, M.D., has been appointed as vice president and chief of hospitalist services by WellStar Health System. In his new role, Dr. Akopov will oversee 35 hospitalists at WellStar Cobb, Douglas, Kennestone, Paulding and Windy Hill Hospitals.

WellStar’s hospitalists play an important role in inpatient care and are typically trained in internal medicine. From admission through discharge, they focus exclusively on inpatient care and may order tests, monitor a patient’s recovery from surgery, prescribe medicine and implement treatment options to ensure a patient’s best outcome.

Dr. Akopov brings more than 25 years of healthcare experience to WellStar.  Most recently, he served as director of hospital medicine services for Emory University Hospital Midtown (EUHM) where he helped establish the facility’s academic hospitalist program. Under his leadership, EUHM’s hospital medicine program grew from eight full-time employees to more than 30.

Academically, he served as Assistant Professor of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine and Associate Program Director with the J. Willis Hurst Internal Medicine Residency Program at EUHM.  While at Emory, Dr. Akopov received a number of teaching awards including multiple Golden Apple Teaching Awards, Emory Hospital Medicine teaching Award and Overall Excellence in Hospital Medicine Award.

Dr. Akopov is board certified in internal medicine.  He received his M.D. from Tbilisi (Republic of Georgia) Medical Institute and completed his residency in Internal Medicine at Emory University Hospital.

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Emory Neurourgeons Treat Patients with Aneurysms Once Deemed Untreatable

Wednesday, January 18th, 2012

It is estimated that one in 50 people in the United States will have a brain aneurysm in their lifetime; a condition that can prove fatal if the aneurysm ruptures within the skull. Emory neurosurgeons now have a device to treat patients with aneurysms that were once deemed untreatable.

Jacques Dion, MD, director of the division of Interventional Neuroradiology and professor of radiology and neurosurgery at the Emory University School of Medicine, is among the first few physicians in the United States and the first in Georgia to use the new Pipeline Embolization Device (PED) to treat large or giant wide-necked aneurysms.

A cerebral aneurysm is a weak spot in the wall of a blood vessel within the brain, characterized by an abnormal ballooning or widening of the vessel. In the United States, a brain aneurysm ruptures every 18 minutes, and nearly half of these cases are fatal. Of those who survive, approximately half will never regain full physical function.

PED is intended for the treatment of adults 22 years of age or older with large or giant wide-necked intracranial aneurysms in the internal carotid artery, the major artery that supplies blood to the front of the brain. The metal device, ranging in size from just 10 to 35 mm, is placed across the neck — or opening of the aneurysm -— with the help of a catheter placed inside the blood vessel. This procedure redirects blood flow away from the aneurysm, causing the blood that remains in the aneurysm to form a clot that serves to prevent the aneurysm from rupturing.

Other existing techniques for treating wide neck aneurysms are often invasive, leading to longer hospital stays and greater risk for complications. They also could be used only on patients who are medically strong and able to withstand an open surgery.

“The Pipeline Device may offer improved patient results with a safer and more effective treatment of large or giant wide-necked aneurysms, which until now has been an unmet clinical need,” says Dion. “We now have both hope and a surgical tool for those patients who have had no other options for treating this often debilitating and even fatal medical condition.”

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New Clinical Trial to Focus on Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

Wednesday, January 18th, 2012

The Cancer Center at Northeast Georgia Medical Center (NGMC) is offering a new clinical trial for patients with previously untreated Stage IV pancreatic cancer. All patients enrolled in this clinical trial will receive the standard chemotherapy used to treat pancreatic cancer and some will receive chemotherapy in combination with a novel monoclonal antibody called bavituximab. NGMC is one of five sites in Georgia participating in the study.

“In prior clinical studies for other cancers, bavituximab in combination with chemotherapy has demonstrated promising tumor response and survival for cancer patients when compared to separate studies using chemotherapy alone,” says Andrew W. Pippas, MD, an oncologist at the John B. Amos Cancer Center and Principal Investigator of the clinical trial for the five trial sites in Georgia.

This clinical trial is provided through the Georgia Center for Oncology Research (Georgia CORE).  Georgia CORE, which was established as a catalyst to increase availability of and access to clinical trials, is one of only a handful of research alliances and centers across the nation offering this trial.

Pancreatic cancer is among the deadliest cancers in the United States with a five-year relative survival rate of just six percent. As part of an effort to double the survival rate for the disease by 2020, the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network is calling attention to the need for increased participation in clinical trials. Clinical trials are vital to making progress and developing new treatments for any disease.  In particular for pancreatic cancer, the lack of treatment options currently available for patients make clinical trials an extremely important part of the research process as scientists seek new, better treatment options that will ultimately increase survival.

“Clinical trials are especially important for pancreatic cancer because so few effective treatment options exist, which is reflected in the dire statistics for this disease. Through participation in clinical trials, patients have access to cutting edge research and are taking an active role in advancing pancreatic cancer research. Clinical trials pave the way to therapeutic breakthroughs,” said Julie Fleshman, president and CEO of the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network.

To learn more about this clinical trial at the Cancer Center at NGMC,  call 770-219-8820 or visit Cancer Trials.

 

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